Necessary but Not Sufficient

Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt, Eli Schragenheim and Carol Ptak

Info

Level of TOC knowledge acquired:

Introductory

Length:

231 pages

Designed for:

Academics, Business owners, Consultants, Implementers, Leaders, Managers, Executives and Students

Topics:

Software and Supply Chain

Industries:

Aerospace, Automotive, Information Technology / Telecommunications, Logistics and Manufacturing

Application:

Buffer Management, Drum-Buffer-Rope and Pull System/Replenishment

Language:

Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, Deutsch, Dutch, English, German, Lithuanian and Spanish

Format:

Paperback

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What is really going inside of these hi-tech companies?

What types of pressures and challenges are they facing?

And how do they cope?

Dr. Goldratt\'s novel presents the role of technology and reveals what is necessary and sufficient when handling the data needs of organizations, to ensure fast results in today\'s bottom-line oriented economy and establish a foundation for future results.

Highlights

  • Technology is worthless if it doesn't bring bottom-line value.
  • ERP implementations are typically seen as automating data flow across different functions in an organization
  • Focus on results for the business, and keep the software simple
  • Extend the solution across the entire supply chain to service the end customer as one logical entity.

After reading the newspapers and following the sharp oscillations of the stock market, it becomes apparent that hi-tech companies are of a different breed. Never before have the chances of making a fortune been so realistic and never before have large companies been so fragile.

What is really going inside of these hi-tech companies? What types of pressures and challenges are they facing? And how do they cope? Computer software providers, especially those that specialize in handling the data needs of organizations, are prime examples of these volatile companies. In the nineties we witnessed their growth from small business into multibillion dollar giants. No wonder investors were attracted. In 1998 it was easy for these companies to raise as much money as they wanted. But now, investment funds have dried up.

Why? And more importantly, is there a way to reverse the trend? This book gives the answers.