The Haystack Syndrome

Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt

Info

Level of TOC knowledge acquired:

Intermediate

Length:

262 pages

Designed for:

Academics, Business owners, Consultants, Implementers, Managers, Executives and Leaders

Topics:

Operations/Production, Finance and Measurements, Ongoing Improvement and Software

Industries:

Manufacturing and Information Technology / Telecommunications

Application:

Drum-Buffer-Rope, Throughput Accounting and Buffer Management

Language:

English and Spanish

Format:

Paperback

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Most of us are drowning in oceans of data, so why does it seem we seldom have sufficient information? This maddening dilemma of our technological age is a factor in every important decision, and an issue we expect to have addressed by modern-day information systems.

Part One: Formalizing the Decision Process - Defining the goal, the measurements, and how to continuously improve the whole system - The Theory of Constraints.

Part Two: The Architecture of an Information System - Dealing with information as it relates to the real world; quantifying Murphy, the time-buffer concept, directing process improvements, measuring local performance.

Part Three: Scheduling - How to implement a real process of ongoing improvement requiring interplay between the system and the manager, resolving all conflicts, considering capacity and protection.

Highlights

  • An exercise to identify the constraints in a manufacturing process, and then decide what to produce.
  • An example in it of a large company that was misled by its cost accounting data to outsource much of its production and drop many of its products.
  • Clearly defines what you need to have in the way of data and how to use these data in order to practice system optimization according to the Theory of Constraints.
  • What you measure and reward is what you get.
  • The definitions of the Theory of Constraints

Most of us are drowning in oceans of data, so why does it seem we seldom have sufficient information? This maddening dilemma of our technological age is a factor in every important decision, and an issue we expect to have addressed by modern-day information systems. Part One: Formalizing the Decision Process - Defining the goal, the measurements, and how to continuously improve the whole system - The Theory of Constraints. Part Two: The Architecture of an Information System - Dealing with information as it relates to the real world; quantifying Murphy, the time-buffer concept, directing process improvements, measuring local performance. Part Three: Scheduling - How to implement a real process of ongoing improvement requiring interplay between the system and the manager, resolving all conflicts, considering capacity and protection.