Mistakes and Difficulties in Working with TOC Logical Tools

Jelena Fedurko


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Level of TOC knowledge acquired:

Advanced

Length:

170 pages

Designed for:

Academics, Consultants and Implementers

Topics:

Thinking Processes

Application:

Current Reality Tree, Evaporating Cloud and Thinking Processes

Language:

English

Format:

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A Helpful Guide to Improve the Quality of Work with TOC Logical Tools

The TOC logical tools are a significant contribution to enhance the understanding of problems and provide a good base for finding and/or developing solutions. Nevertheless, in many cases those using the tools do not fully benefit from working with them because of mistakes and lack of clarity in the guidelines.

Jelena has designed this textbook as a reference guide for members of the TOC community who have tried working with the logical tools and have not seen the value from their efforts, but still have the stamina to learn more about how to use them correctly.

Mistakes and Difficulties in Working with TOC Logical Tools focuses on typical errors in wording, content, logic and purpose of Clouds and Current Reality Trees (CRTs) and looks into confusion between necessity and sufficiency logic.  You will be exposed to several types of mistakes, and one by one Jelena will explain why it is a mistake, show examples, and offer rules and guidelines on how to avoid the mistakes. It also offers a case study for individual work and provides the answers.  

Highlights:

  • Typical mistakes in clouds
  • Mistakes and difficulties in building the Current Reality Tree (CRT)
  • Frequent confusion regarding necessity logic versus sufficiency logic as related to TOC logical tools

PART 1. TYPICAL MISTAKES IN CLOUDS

CHAPTER 1. Mistakes in wording the entities in the Cloud

CHAPTER 2. Mistakes in the logic of the Cloud                   

CHAPTER 3. Checking Cloud wording and logic –A case for analysis

CHAPTER 4. Checking Cloud wording and logic –Answers to the case           

CHAPTER 5. Mistake: The statement in A is a simple summation of the statements in B and C

CHAPTER 6. Mistake: The statement at the tip of the arrow speaks about the same as the statement at the tail of the arrow, only in a more generic way or with different wording   

CHAPTER 7. Mistake: D does NOT endanger C, and/or D’ does NOT endanger В

CHAPTER 8. Mistake: You have put your solution in D or D’ in the Cloud that you plan to use for getting a buy-in

CHAPTER 9. Mistake: D and D’ in an UDE Cloud are worded as an internal dilemma regarding a decision for the future                   

CHAPTER 10. Mistake: Mirror reflection between an UDE, B and D in the UDE Cloud   

CHAPTER 11. How to avoid mistakes in UDEs – 10 UDE Rules                   

CHAPTER 12. A brief recap on 7 typical mistakes in surfacing assumptions in Clouds and 4+2 Assumption Rules                   

CHAPTER 13. Some thoughts about a claim that an objective of a project should be an Injection to a Cloud.

CHAPTER 14. Frequent sloppy work when Cloud owners want to use the Cloud for justification of their solution                    

CHAPTER 15. The Cloud is NOT for goal-setting                   

CHAPTER 16. A confusing claim that the Cloud is BASED ON Necessity logic

PART 2. MISTAKES AND DIFFICULTIES IN BUILDING THE CURRENT REALITY TREE (CRT)

CHAPTER 17. Two approaches to CRT

CHAPTER 18. Mistake: At the bottom of the CRT you state that the Core Problem of the system is the absence of your solution

CHAPTER 19. Mistake: At the bottom of the CRT you put a cause that is outside of your control                   

PART 3. FREQUENT CONFUSION REGARDING NECESSITY LOGIC VERSUS SUFFICIENCY LOGIC AS RELATED TO TOC LOGICAL TOOLS

CHAPTER 20. A brief recap on the distinction between Necessity and Sufficiency

CHAPTER 21. Sufficiency inside the cause                   

CHAPTER 22. When an announced cause and effect relationship depends on an implied meaning  158           

CHAPTER 23. A confusing claim that CRT and FRT are BASED ON Sufficiency logic                    

AFTERWORD