Isn\'t It Obvious?

Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt

Info

Level of TOC knowledge acquired:

Intermediate and Introductory

Length:

232 pages

Designed for:

Business owners, Consultants, Implementers, Leaders and Managers

Topics:

Distribution and Supply Chain

Industries:

Consumer Products, Logistics and Retail

Application:

Pull System/Replenishment

Language:

Dutch, English and Spanish

Format:

Paperback

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A breakthrough solution is exposed when some unexpected events force Caroline and Paul, a married couple working for their family’s retail business, to make a few small changes in the way things are done. A solution that propels the family’s regional chain of stores into a very profitable, rapidly growing, international enterprise. If there is a hint of Jonah, from THE GOAL, reappearing in this novel, it is Henry, the soon-to-retire president and majority owner of the company who logically states that, “if you do not deal directly with the core problem, don’t expect significant improvement.” Eli Goldratt’s Theory of Constraints is woven throughout this book but answers are not handed to you. The reader, along with the characters in the book, work through the process together to discover solutions.

This book does for Retailing what Goldratt\'s international best-seller, The Goal, did for manufacturing. The elegant but simple solutions give the reader that sensation that followers love about Goldratt: “Ah-ha! Now I get it!” And that’s when Goldratt says: “Isn’t It Obvious?”

Paul was brushing his teeth as his cell phone rang. Caroline reached across the king-sized bed to his nightstand and answered it.



“Oh, I see,” she said, got up and walked to the bathroom. “Honey, it’s the alarm company.”

Quickly rinsing his mouth, he took the phone.

“Yes?”

“Mr. White, this is Darla from Granbury Emergency Services. A water leak has been detected in the A-5 warehouse facilities at the Boca Beach Mall.” Her voice was almost metallic. Paul confirmed the call, and went back to brushing his teeth. One of the most aggravating aspects of having a cell phone was that people who monitored the alarms that went off by themselves could find you anywhere, anytime.

As he pulled on a pair of grey slacks, the cell phone rang again.