Applications of Strategy and Tactics Trees in Organizations (Chapter 34 of the Theory of Constraints Handbook)

Lisa Ferguson


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Level of TOC knowledge acquired:

Advanced and Intermediate

Length:

32 pages

Designed for:

Business owners, Consultants, Executives, Leaders and Managers

Topics:

Strategy and Tactics and Viable Vision

Application:

Strategy & Tactic Tree

Language:

English

Format:

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Change is difficult to achieve. The Strategy and Tactics (S&T) tree is a powerful tool for addressing the question of "How to cause a change?" in an organization. If you are considering implementing any kind of change, you will discover why the S&T tree is a compelling enabler of change.

When implementing a change in an organization, the basic requirements for success are communication and effectively synchronized actions in the plan. The S&T tree is the asset for achieving your goal because it presents all the logic of the plan and is easy to communicate to others.

After writing a strategic plan using the S&T tree, a Fortune 500 executive referred to his company's past planning efforts as "amateurish." This chapter provides an understanding of how to cause the change through descriptions of various applications of S&T trees for organizations to become "ever-flourishing."

The five engines of disharmony are:

  • 1. Many people do not really know (cannot clearly verbalize) how what they are doing is essential to the organization. Would you be motivated if you were in that position?
  • 2. Most people do not really understand how the work of some of their colleagues is essential to, or, at a minimum, contributes to the organization. Would you be collaborative if you were in that position?
  • 3. People are operating under conflicts.
  • 4. Many people are required to do tasks for which the reason no longer exists. People’s intuition is always strong enough to feel it, but not always strong enough to explain it convincingly to their superiors.
  • 5. There are gaps between responsibility and authority. You, like any other manager, know firsthand how frustrating it is to have something for which you are responsible to accomplish, but you do not have the authority for some of the actions that mu

Comprehensive coverage of the Theory of Constraints 

Complete Table of contents of the Theory of Constraints Handbook

About the Authors:

James F. Cox III, Ph.D, CFPIM, CIRM, holds TOCICO certifications in all disciplines. He is a Jonah's Jonah, Professor Emeritus, and was the Robert O. Arnold Professor of Business in the Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia. Dr. Cox has written three books on TOC.

John Schleier holds TOCICO certifications in all disciplines. He was President and Chief Operating Officer of the Mortgage Services Division of Alltel, Inc., Executive Vice President of Computer Power, Inc., and Director of Office Systems and Data Delivery for IBM.

 

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